Mapping the Green Deal with ArchitectMap

Once Green Deal is live, and indeed in the run up preparation phase, it will be of great advantage to be able to see who are the Green Deal ‘players’ on your street, in your estate, neighbourhood or town.

Green Deal, in addition to improving energy efficiency of buildings, both domestic and commercial, also has aims of carbon reduction and providing increased work for micro / small SMEs. Using local SME’s hits a number of plus buttons: carbon reduction through low transport, localism and local spend, and of course employing local SME’s to continue existing relationships.

One of the key elements in the Fairsnape “More than Just a Green Deal” support programme is visibility – being visible as a green deal player to learn, share and join in Green Deal conversations, but also to shout about preparation, accreditations and of course services offered.

ArchitectMap

It is excellent news then that ArchitectMap, a brilliant geo-location mapping app, developed by Su Butcher and Mark Schumann, for Architects, Contractors, Product organisations and more, now enables you to filter for green deal organisations.

We buy a whole range of services and goods on line these days, so why not select your green deal services online?  Sign up for ArchitectMap here and start sharing your Green Deal intentions and achievements. And of course start using ArchitectMap to find your Green Deal Team.

At the moment Contractors and Installers can map themselves, shortly Assessors, Surveyors and Product companies will be able to do so.

If you would like to know more, and how Architectmap came about check here, or get in touch with @SuButcher and or @MarkSchuey

If you would like to know more about Fairsnape Green Deal support please do get in touch with myself via @fairsnape or via email

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Can social media drive built environment sustainability?

Can social media drive built environment sustainability?

Over the last few weeks I have been working with Ryan at the Construction Network and the team at Sustainability Now on an exciting project to bring social media discussions into the free to attend virtual online Sustainability Now event on the 9th and 10th November

There are two main linked themes to this initiative, a unique sustainability social media ‘list’ and an online social media lounge

The listing, in collaboration with Peerindex ranks UK sustainability twitter users on authority in sustainability and is derived from other lists recently curated by the Construction Network (eg Architecture with Su Butcher and Built Environment Paul Wilkinson for example). It includes all aspects of the built environment from civil engineering to FM to PR to architecture to products to construction and more.

Being ranked on authority in sustainability we will see some surprises when the list is launched at midday during the show. Those with low a Peerindex score, or low activity may well see themselves quite high on authority listing, whereas those with very high activity or Peerindex scores may not rank in the top 100 at all.  Quality not quantity perhaps?

Peerindex describe authority as the measure of trust; calculating how much others rely on your recommendations and opinion in (sustainability), and is one component of the overall PI score. ie, it is where people will go for sustainability information on twitter (At least to UK sources, we may well expand to a global list next time)

The second exciting initiative is the social media lounge. Over the two days of the show a number of social media practitioners and advocates will be in a virtual lounge discussing the use of social media in the built environment, and in particular how it can be used to drive sustainability.

Those in the lounge will include @gb_news and @greenbuildexpo, @EEPaul @CKEgroup, @SuButcher @KirstieColledge @priteshpatel9 @KLHSustain @carinawtweets, @DIEMltd.

Amanda Jones @Peerindex will also be online to answer questions on the sustainability list, alongside myself and Ryan (@fairsnape and @ryanbriggstcn)

For more background information see:

Sustainability Now Registration Page

Social Media Lounge Residents 

Sponsors and Supporters 

 

 

Green Build News Article

 

 

Gone phishing … changing passwords isn’t enough.

I had started writing this piece yesterday on a train journey back from Leeds, and as phishing was mentioned on Radio4 this morning, including @subutchers ‘to the point’ tweet about password strengths being read out, I thought I had better finish it and post.

I felt ‘obliged’ to post something on passwords and phishing as I encourage and support people/organisations to join up to, explore and use twitter for a number of reasons (another blog item there!), as for example at the well received presentation on social media that I and @epaul gave to the Black Country Construction Excellence Club during the week. As a result a good many people have taken  their first steps into the world of twitter.
Also a high number of trusted friends have succumbed to the recent phishing attacks
Phishing is just what it says on the tin, scams and cons to get you to part with your password and twitter account details. And as Su Butcher says the strength of the password is irrelevant if you give it away! Phishers don’t invest in time and effort in cracking your password – they simply ask for it. And get it.
So why do we give it away?
It seems twitter users see the community as a nice friendly place (it hasn’t until recently had the hard core spam that email for example has had) So when a friend suggests a nice application for increasing followers, monitoring twitter influence, testing your IQ,suggesting people you should follow etc, we fall for it and give up our high strength password. And of course re-tweet that we have done so.
In addition there are an ever increasing number of new twitter apps for pc’s mac’s and phones and don’t we just love trying them out? And of course we give our ultra high strength password away.
There are phish scams that offer to clear your tweets up if you have fallen foul to a regular phishing attacks, all you need to do is hand over your new unbreakable password. And it seems tweeters do, again!
As I mentioned in the Black Country to potential twitters: treat your password as though it was your bank account details. Don’t give access to others simple. Or and if you do, change it immediately.
More importantly though is to check and know who you have given access and authority to. You may be surprised – I was and I thought I was ultra careful.
  • Go to the web application for twitter and open your account. (with the far more sophisticated twitter apps available many do not ever go back to the basic web app, this is a mistake as it is here that your account details are held and can be changed)
  • Go to settings
  • Go to connections
  • Here you will see 

    You’ve allowed the following applications to access your account:

  • Revoke access if you have any doubt what so ever.
  • Save
  • Then change password
Do this regularly and don’t visit links in tweets if you have any suspicions at all
But of course phishing is very successful due to the viral re-tweeting of tweets. NEVER re-tweet a link without you have checked it, otherwise you become the phisher!
And if you see someone has been caught, let them know, and refer them to some good advice.