Can social media power the Green Deal (and Sustainability)?

Earlier this year, through Be2camp, the built environment social media advocacy, we published a guide on using social media to improve understanding and application of Green Deal issues.  

This was discussed in a 2degreenework interview with myself and Stephen Kennett 

Stephen Kennett : You’ve launched the ‘Social media framework for the Green Deal’, can you explain what it’s about?

Martin Brown: Of course – It’s a wiki guide to using social media to improve understanding and application of Green Deal issues. It was initially compiled by a group of social media and sustainability advocates all working in the Green Deal space, and brought together through the Be2camp movement.

The purpose of the guide is to explain how social media can be used to understand, learn, and share Green Deal learning. The aim is to look at four key themes: Green Deal workflow – in other words, how the Green Deal will work in practice; Green Deal delivery – installation and the skills issues; Green Deal business issues; and visibility – promoting best practice and good news.

SK: Why use social media in the world of Green Deal? …. Read the rest of the interview here 

…. Access the guide to social media for green deal here  and please do add to the guide …

Or for more information just get in touch or drop us a tweet

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Social Media: Awards and Events – London, Sept 26th

 

We have gain chosen to run our Be2Camp flagship event, celebrating the application of social media in the architecture, engineering, construction and sustainability fields during London social Media Week 

The half-day event will be held on Wednesday 26 September at the Building Centre in London WC1, and – like last year – will be a lively mix of awards showcasing best practice in technology and social media and informative talks from leading thinkers on technology, sustainability and the built environment.

Be2Awards nominations open

Please submit your nominations for the awards short-lists. The categories include:

  • Built environment blogger of the Year
  • Best sustainability blog
  • Best AEC social media blog
  • Best use of Twitter
  • Best AEC collaboration platform
  • Best AEC community, network or community application
  • Best use of Web 2.0 for construction products
  • Best location-based AEC application
  • Best ‘internet of things’ application
  • Best mobile application
  • Best virtual or hybrid event
  • Be2 media award
  • Best use of social media in an AEC PR campaign
  • Best use of social media in an AEC marketing campaign
  • Best AEC education and learning project
  • Best charity, third sector use of social media
  • Best AEC use of photo / video

To nominate, you will need to login on the Be2Awards website (if you haven’t previously done so, click ‘login’ at the top left-hand corner, then add your registration detail; once your registration has been accepted, you will be able to make your nominations). Being Web 2.0 people, our nomination process uses an online discussion board. You may nominate once in as many categories as you like; candidates may be eligible in more than one category.

The 2011 Awards (see shortlists and successful candidates here) saw over 100 nominations across these categories, and we expect even more competition this year.

Be2Talks – We are currently finalising the speakers for the Be2Talks. If you have ideas for speakers, please email Martin Brown.

Sponsors – Meantime, we are also looking for sponsors. We have vacancies for a main sponsor and we ideally want sponsors for every category (this will help cover event expenses and ensure a top-notch event). If you can help, please get in touch.

Involved in Sustainability Communications?  Do two events in one day

We have been working with the Guardian‘s Sustainable Business initiative, which is holding its own Social Media for Sustainability event in London during Social Media Week. The half-day training course is at the Guardian‘s offices near King’s Cross station on the morning of 26 September – so you can take in both events! (see also Be2Awards news)

Powering the Green Deal

How social media can help drive the Green Deal programme.

Great to see our interview article in latest issue of GreenBuildNews. (Page 16, special report)

The original interview with Stephen Kennet can be found on 2DegreesNetwork

The Be2 Social Media Guide to Green Deal (wiki) can be found here

– Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Is the new Linkedin app a game changer?

I must admit I have had a love hate relationship with Linkedin.

Loved it for its contact management relationship building power and the amazing groups which I see as modern digital communities of practice, Hated it for the clunky nature of searching – you have to go looking for interesting updates, even the email alerts prove too spammy as they only tell you an update has been made, not its content.

Until recently it hasnt fitted into my online workflow as say Twitter or Flipboard has (scan, save to instapaper, read offline at leisure then archive to Evernote)

I say until recently … the new iPad Linkedin app I am begining to see as a game changer. It has been designed as a morning feed app – ie you can bring yourself up to date with news from your contacts and updates to groups over a morning coffee, and note interesting articles for reading later, With a similar concept to Flipboard, it brings a brand new look and feel to the social network, and its a pleasure to use.

Since using the iPad app I have discovered much more function and ease in using Linkedin, for example running conversations through the message function, and I have been using Linkedin on other devices for a good number of years.

I am looking forward to learning more user tips from expert Su Butcher at our Linkedin/Twiiter training workshop in Manchester next week. See you there?

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Could built environment leaders cut it in a digital world?

An excellent Communique newsfeed from Nancy Settle-Murphy this morning, at looking at effectiveness of leaders in a virtual world.  It strikes me this is a lesson perhaps for built environment and construction leaders as we move into a communication era that is increasingly digital, web based, social media enabled and BIM (Building Information Model) focused:

Even the most experienced team leaders can make us weep with boredom. They torture us with their monotone narrations of 10-Mb slide decks. They regale us with irrelevant minutiae, while sidestepping the really important stuff. Their meetings are more like monologues, with everyone else listening from the sidelines. And for the most part, they probably imagine they’re pretty interesting people!

When we experience boring leaders face-to-face, we have to at least pretend to be somewhat interested. We might take notes (even if it’s a shopping list!), throwing in a few occasional nods so we won’t be called on to replay key points. Copious amounts of caffeine help to some degree, as do the many bio breaks we’ll inevitably need as a result. And who hasn’t had a colleague place an “emergency” phone call in extreme cases of ennui?

Tuning out boring virtual leaders is far easier. Once you put yourself on mute, there’s no end to the more important things you can do, like responding to emails, writing up your latest status report, or finding the best price on that new digital camera you’ve been pining for. (If you work from home, this “important” work can extend to laundry, dinner prep, weight-lifting and more.) As long as you’re within earshot of the conversation, your team leader may assume you’re present while in fact you are completely absent.

So, how can boring virtual leaders learn to become more captivating? (And no, it is not an inherent skill that some are just born with!) In this issue, I take a look at some steps even the blandest leader can take to evolve into an engaging, stimulating and captivating leader, from near or far.

No one actively aspires to be boring. And yet regrettably, few leaders actively attempt to be interesting.

Read on … from Nancy Settle-Murphy on Commique 

Five Emerging Themes in Construction CSR

A recent CSR in construction workshop ran some very interesting discussions on just what CSR in construction is, what it could be and what it should be.

There emerged a number of salient, central themes:

CSR is not a badge, a new lick of paint or indeed something to do to generate responses in bids and PQQ’s to win work, but is something that goes deep into the organisation. It is the brand, image and reputation of the business, in many ways CSR is part of the DNA upon which the business will grow and flourish. Words such as heart or soul of the business become relevant.

CSR thinking will challenge existing business models. We have moved from a era of CSR being bad news, not seen as a business issue, to one of commitment to being responsible and doing good whilst running a business. The challenge businesses may now face is moving forward, how to make a construction business of out doing good, where social responsibility is the vision and core of the organisation. Combining triple line thinking in an integrated strategy and integrated reporting approach will give new perspectives on construction businesses.

CSR approaches cannot be simply imposed top down. Whilst needing strong leadership vision, CSR requires real engagement of all staff and indeed all those who work for the business through the supply chains. Empowering managers to lead on CSR and engaging people in sharing CSR good news stories will become essential.

CSR transparency means all aspects of construction are increasingly on open public display. We cannot put one message to clients in bids, another to staff and still allow conflicting, or perhaps irresponsible practices to exist. The recent Goldman Sachs is a timely reminder that we are in the Age of Damage as described David Jones in Who Cares Wins

The power and potential of social media is yet to be realised. On one hand it presents a phenomenal tool for sharing news, keeping informed and engaging with clients and partners, on the other hand it can be the Achilles heel, rapidly broadcasting irresponsible practices or intentions. Having an appropriately positive approach to Social Media with guidelines or codes of practice for use by staff in the business and on projects will increasingly become high priority.

Supporting built environment organisations on developing CSR strategies it is encouraging to see a real desire for strategic CSR approaches that go beyond the volunteering and sponsorship models. If you wish to engage in conversations on CSR in construction follow and join me on twitter @fairsnape, subscribe to or share this blog post, or get in touch via fairsnape@gmail.com

Preston Bloggers Award for fairsnape blog

Its always great to get acknowledgement for this blog, hence am delighted to have received recognition from  EAOM, an online marketing agency in Chorley, Lancs, as worthy of their Preston Bloggers Award.

Part of our blog training process for our clients is to show examples of great blog posts which created by Preston based bloggers

We have reviewed many local blogs  judging them on overall quality, readability, relevance and the value they add to the community and/or to their customers.

After much deliberation we created a short list of winners which includes Fairsnape. We really feel you got blogging right with posts such as Can social media drive built environment sustainability? showing what Preston has to offer to the blogging community.

As winner we’ll be showcasing your blog in a post on our own blog on eaonlinemarketing.co.uk/blog and twitter feed in the coming weeks.

This fairsnape blog started way back in January 2007, as a service to the clients I then supported, and many of whom I still do, on built environment improvement. It soon became a more generic industry news, information sharing and comment blog, focusing on a core of sustainability, collaborative working and the use of social media.

The blog went through change as the potential and power of twitter as a micro blogging tool for news and link sharing became obvious, leaving the fairsnape blog to become more of the commentary service it is today.